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Memory And Learning, Part 2

Memory And Learning, Part 2

Last month, I began a series of articles about knowing and using the constraints of perception and memory. Unlike some other constraints on learning interventions (such as time), there are no ways to get around memory. We either work with it or people learn less well (or not at all). Here is my second article discussing the relationship between memory and learning.

How To Design To Help Working Memory, Part 1

How To Design To Help Working Memory, Part 1

When working on a project, it’s super helpful to understand and work within the project’s real needs and constraints. For example, when buying a car, knowing your finances and true needs will help you take into account what you can afford (including total cost of ownership) as well as what you really need. This thinking leads to better decisions. Because it’s often not possible to have everything, knowing what your client values most (for example, ease of updating and reduced costs for support) and what the audience most needs (for example, a quick start on basic tasks) helps you prioritize what you build and how you build it. Here is how to design to help working memory and offer more effective learning experience to your learners.

Enhancing Working Memory: 6 Strategies for eLearning Professionals

Enhancing Working Memory: 6 Strategies for eLearning Professionals

Without any doubt, one of the most important brain functions with a significant impact in the learning process is working memory. In this article, I’ll explore how working memory functions and I’ll offer 6 strategies that eLearning professionals should follow in order to increase the effectiveness of their eLearning courses by enhancing working memory and, thus, facilitating the transition of knowledge from the short to the long-term memory.

Enhancing Long-Term Memory: 7 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Enhancing Long-Term Memory: 7 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Memories may serve as fond reminders of the past, but they also allow us to achieve learning goals and expand our educational horizons in the here-and-now. It would be nice if our minds functioned like cameras and we could access our picture-like memories at any time we wanted. Unfortunately, this is not how it works; everything we see and hear is stored in different areas of our brains and we can easily lose information it if we don’t make a conscious effort to retain it. In this article, I’ll explore the basics of long-term memory and I'll share 7 strategies you can use to create memorable eLearning courses, the content of which will be stored in your audience's minds for a long, long time.

Enhancing Short-Term Memory: 5 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Enhancing Short-Term Memory: 5 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Long-term memory may get all the glory, but knowledge retention and information recall wouldn’t be possible without the aid of its more temporary counterpart. In this article, I’ll discuss the basics of the short-term memory and I’ll highlight 5 strategies that eLearning professionals may follow in order to enhance short-term memory and, thus, to increase the effectiveness of eLearning deliverables.

Mobile Learning meets E-Memory

Mobile Learning meets E-Memory

Studies suggest that access to the limitless information on the internet has changed the way our memories work. Researcher Robert Clowes argues that we now have two memory systems: an old system – our brains – and a newer system he calls E-Memory. If E-Memory is indeed the direction in which our memories are evolving, Mobile Learning is critical to effective talent development!