Your Brainstorming Pocket Guide

Your Brainstorming Pocket Guide Your Brainstorming Pocket Guide http://bit.ly/1bNlN3y
Published in General
Tuesday, 17 December 2013 18:29
For all of you who aren't familiar with brainstorming, let's say it's that time when your mind is allowed to wander in close or far away circles, around a certain topic, picking up words, ideas, details, feelings, even sentences that are topic-related. You can do this individually or in a group. No limiting, no censoring information, no wrong answers. Once you have jotted them down, you can start putting the pieces in the right order, therefore, creating a solid framework. Hilarious as it might seem, I used a little brainstorming to write this post about brainstorming.

When do we need a brainstorming framework?

  • when we have problems to solve;
  • when we have no clue whatsoever of what to write about, and we need to do it ASAP;
  • when we are desperately trying to understand and learn something;
  • when we want to see how far our creativity can go.


Rules that you probably won't feel the need to break

  1. Keep negativity out of the process
    No one gets to tell anyone else that his word or idea doesn't work. This means you will never get rejected in this game.

  2. No idea is too much
    It will be fun to sort them out and “tame” the wild ones.

  3. Quantity, not quality
    Or would you prefer “much is better”? The thinking process is far easier when you turn off the filter, and you don't have to come up with ideas in their final form.

  4. Sharing is caring
    Everyone is free to expand any ideas that come to the surface, no matter if they are their own or not.

  5. All ideas are equally worthy.

  6. Don't focus, just relax your mind.

 

5 Brainy techniques

 

  1. Freewriting
    You can do this on paper or from your computer, setting a time or a space limit. You start writing by focusing on a topic, but you are free to jot down anything that comes into your mind, even “I have absolutely no idea what to write”. Although you will have lots of fillers in the end, this freedom of thought will either reveal bits of precious info, or will simply give you a fresh mindset for your writing. 


  2. 3-Perspective Technique
    If you want to deepen your understanding upon a subject, it might help brainstorming from different perspectives. Try answering questions like: What's the subject? How's it different from others? What's its history? Did it change in time? What does the subject influence and how? etc. This will help you describe the subject, and trace its evolution and relationships.


  3. Similes Technique
    All you have to do is complete the sentence ____________________ is/was/are/were like _____________________. The first blank belongs to the topic you are focusing on; the second is for your brainstorming answers. You should write them down as they pop up; try to find as many as possible. 


  4. Listing Technique
    You have to make lists of words and phrases related either to your subject, or to subjects completely opposite to your initial subject.


  5. Mapping Technique
    Do it on paper or by using a mind mapping software. This method will help you put your thoughts in order like no other. Start from your central topic, write down all related words and phrases in a random manner, and later link them according to their role and influence.

 

Read 1071 times Last modified on Tuesday, 17 December 2013 18:42
Nadina Lupu

Nadina Lupu is a Creative Copywriter at Mindomo, a software that sets free great ideas and turns them into action. 

Nadina has been a wordsmith for project and event management organizations. Currently, she focuses her writing on digital teaching and learning, business collaboration and team communication.

Website: www.mindomo.com/

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