Instructional Design

The concept of Instructional Design. Models, theories, trends, pitfalls, and anything you need to know, written from our Instructional Design experts.

Why Do You Need An Instructional Design Degree?

Why Do You Need An Instructional Design Degree?

The issue of whether an Instructional Design degree should be a prerequisite is a hotly debated topic in the eLearning industry. Some believe that earning a degree gives instructional designers the model, theory, and tech knowledge they need. Others are of the opinion that on-the-job experience and self-study can instill that same knowledge. In this article I will take a look at why you may want to consider an Instructional Design degree.

Instructional design trends 2015

2015 Instructional Design Trends Compass: Calling IDs to Action

Attention, fellow instructional designers! Our industry is all about learning and change, but our target audiences are not the only ones who should be learning. This in-depth article will help you stay at the forefront of 2015 instructional design trends. And it’s not just a list of the trends, but a “compass” with calls to action to help you implement them.

The Forgetting Curve in eLearning: What eLearning Professionals Should Know

The Forgetting Curve in eLearning: What eLearning Professionals Should Know

You may have devoted countless hours to content development and eLearning course design, but all will be for naught if your learners will not be able to commit what they've learned to long term memory. In this article, you will find everything you need to know about the forgetting curve in eLearning, so that your learners will always come away with the knowledge and skill sets they need to achieve their goals.

Should an Instructional Designer Have an Advanced Degree?

Should an Instructional Designer Have an Advanced Degree?

As the field of eLearning continues to grow, so does the demand for instructional designers. If you look at job listings for many corporations, the listing specifies that they are seeking a qualified applicant who has an advanced degree. Is it necessary for someone to have a graduate degree in order to design quality training courses? It's certainly a matter of perspective with more than one opinion.

Your Ticket to Great Instructional Design

Your Ticket to Great Instructional Design

Instructional design is certainly not an easy business. Having been in the learning, training and development industry for more than 27 years, I can assertively say so. Instructional designers shoulder the important responsibility of sugar-coating the critical learning content in such a manner that training becomes not just a mandatory activity, but something that employees love. Now how do you do that? How can you possibly turn something boring into something that employees love? The answer to that is what differentiates a good instructional design from a poor one.